Ad blocking passes 2 billion worldwide


This post is by Doc Searls from Doc Searls Weblog


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GlobalWebIndex‘s Global Ad-Blocking Behavior report says 47% of us are blocking ads now. It also says, “As a younger and more engaged audience, ad-blockers also are much more likely to be paying subscribers and consumers. Ad-free premium services are especially attractive.”

This is pretty close to Don Marti‘s long-standing claim that readers who protect their privacy are more valuable than readers who don’t.

And now there is also this, from Internet World Stats:

So, since GlobalWebIndex says 47% of us are using ad blockers, and Internet World Stats says there were 4,312,982,270 Internet users by the end of last year, more than 2,027,101.667 people are now blocking ads worldwide.

What those say together is, more than two billion people are blocking ads today.

Perspective: back in 2015, we were already calling ad blocking The biggest boycott in human history. And that was when the number was just “approaching 200 million.”

If we Continue reading "Ad blocking passes 2 billion worldwide"

Security Event Token (SET) delivery specifications updated in preparation for IETF 104


This post is by Mike Jones from Mike Jones: self-issued


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IETF logoThe two Security Event Token (SET) delivery specifications have been updated to address working group feedback received, in preparation for discussions at IETF 104 in Prague. The Push Delivery spec went through working group last call (WGLC). It has been updated to incorporate the WGLC comments. Changes made are summarized in the spec change log, the contents of which were also posted to the working group mailing list. Thanks to Annabelle Backman for the edits to the Push Delivery spec.

It’s worth noting that the Push Delivery spec and the Security Event Token (SET) are now being used in early Risk and Incident Sharing and Coordination (RISC) deployments, including between Google and Adobe. See the article about these deployments by Mat Honan of BuzzFeed.

Changes to the Poll Delivery spec are also summarized in that spec’s change log, which contains:

OAuth Device Flow spec renamed to “OAuth 2.0 Device Authorization Grant”


This post is by Mike Jones from Mike Jones: self-issued


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OAuth logoResponding to feedback from multiple parties that the title “OAuth 2.0 Device Flow for Browserless and Input Constrained Devices” was too much of a mouthful, the title of the specification has been simplified to “OAuth 2.0 Device Authorization Grant”. Likewise, we received feedback that “Device flow” was an insider term that caused more confusion than clarity, so its use has been removed from the specification. Finally, last minute feedback was received that client authorization and error handling were not explicitly spelled out. The specification now says that these occur in the same manner as in OAuth 2.0 [RFC 6749].

Many thanks to William Denniss for performing these edits! Hopefully this will be the draft that is sent to the RFC Editor.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

Additional COSE algorithms used by W3C Web Authentication (WebAuthn)


This post is by Mike Jones from Mike Jones: self-issued


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IETF logoThe new COSE working group charter includes this deliverable:

4. Define the algorithms needed for W3C Web Authentication for COSE using draft-jones-webauthn-cose-algorithms and draft-jones-webauthn-secp256k1 as a starting point (Informational).

I have written draft-jones-cose-additional-algorithms, which combines these starting points into a single draft, which registers these algorithms in the IANA COSE registries. When not already registered, this draft also registers these algorithms for use with JOSE in the IANA JOSE registries. I believe that this draft is ready for working group adoption to satisfy this deliverable.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

FIDO2 Client to Authenticator Protocol (CTAP) standard published


This post is by Mike Jones from Mike Jones: self-issued


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FIDO logoI’m thrilled to report that the FIDO2 Client to Authenticator Protocol (CTAP) is now a published FIDO Alliance standard! Together with the now-standard Web Authentication (WebAuthn) specification, this completes standardization of the APIs and protocols needed to enable password-less logins on the Web, on PCs, and on and mobile devices. This is a huge step forward for online security, privacy, and convenience!

The FIDO2 CTAP standard is available in HTML and PDF versions at these locations:

The W3C Web Authentication (WebAuthn) specification is now a standard!


This post is by Mike Jones from Mike Jones: self-issued


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W3C logoI’m thrilled to report that the Web Authentication (WebAuthn) specification is now a W3C standard! See the W3C press release describing this major advance in Web security and convenience, which enables logging in without passwords. Alex Simons, Microsoft Vice President of Identity Program Management is quoted in the release, saying:

“Our work with W3C and FIDO Alliance, and contributions to FIDO2 standards have been a critical piece of Microsoft’s commitment to a world without passwords, which started in 2015. Today, Windows 10 with Microsoft Edge fully supports the WebAuthn standard and millions of users can log in to their Microsoft account without using a password.”

The release also describes commitments to the standard by Google, Mozilla, and Apple, among others. Thanks to all who worked on the standard and who built implementations as we developed the standard – ensuring that that the standard can be used for a broad Continue reading "The W3C Web Authentication (WebAuthn) specification is now a standard!"

The Spinner’s hack on journalism


This post is by Doc Searls from Doc Searls Weblog


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The Spinner* (with the asterisk) is “a service that enables you to subconsciously influence a specific person, by controlling the content on the websites he or she usually visits.” Meaning you can hire The Spinner* to hack another person.

It works like this:

  1. You pay The Spinner* $29. For example, to urge a friend to stop smoking. (That’s the most positive and innocent example the company gives.)
  2. The Spinner* provides you with an ordinary link you then text to your friend. When that friend clicks on the link, they get a tracking cookie that works as a bulls-eye for The Spinner* to hit with 10 different articles written specifically to influence that friend. He or she “will be strategically bombarded with articles and media tailored to him or her.” Specifically, 180 of these things. All in Facebook, which is built for this kind of thing.

The Spinner* Continue reading "The Spinner’s hack on journalism"

Decentralized Identifiers


This post is by Phil Windley's Technometria from Phil Windley's Technometria


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Summary: Decentralized identifiers are one of the foundational ideas for supporting self-sovereign identity. This post describes how decentralized identifiers work.

Key and Label

Decentralized identifiers are one of several foundational technologies for building a metasystem for self-sovereign identity. I wrote about verifiable credentials and their exchange previously. Just like the Web required not only URLs, but also a specification for web page formats and how web pages could be formatted, self-sovereign identity needs DIDs, a protocol for creating DID-based relationships, and a specification and protocol for verifiable credential exchange.

Identifiers label things. Computer systems are full of identifiers. Variable names are identifiers. Usernames are identifiers. Filenames are identifiers. IP numbers are identifiers. Domain names are identifiers. Email addresses are identifiers. URLs are identifiers.1 Any time we use a unique (within some context) string to label something for quick reference, we're giving it an identifier. A computer system uses identifiers to correlate all

DID Syntax
Continue reading "Decentralized Identifiers"

Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) spec fixing nits


This post is by Mike Jones from Mike Jones: self-issued


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IETF logoThe Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) specification has been updated to address issues identified by Roman Danyliw while writing his shepherd review. Thanks to Samuel Erdtman for fixing an incorrect example.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

On Amazon, New York, New Jersey and urban planning


This post is by Doc Searls from Doc Searls Weblog


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In a press release, Amazon explained why it backed out of its plan to open a new headquarters in New York City:

For Amazon, the commitment to build a new headquarters requires positive, collaborative relationships with state and local elected officials who will be supportive over the long-term. While polls show that 70% of New Yorkers support our plans and investment, a number of state and local politicians have made it clear that they oppose our presence and will not work with us to build the type of relationships that are required to go forward with the project we and many others envisioned in Long Island City.

So, even if the economics were good, the politics were bad.

The hmm for me is why not New Jersey? Given the enormous economic and political overhead of operating in New York, I’m wondering why Amazon didn’t consider New Jersey first. Continue reading "On Amazon, New York, New Jersey and urban planning"

On renting cars


This post is by Doc Searls from Doc Searls Weblog


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I came up with that law in the last millennium and it applied until Chevy discontinued the Cavalier in 2005. Now it should say, “You’re going to get whatever they’ve got.”

The difference is that every car rental agency in days of yore tended to get their cars from a single car maker, and now they don’t. Back then, if an agency’s relationship was with General Motors, which most of them seemed to be, the lot would have more of GM’s worst car than of any other kind of car. Now the car you rent truly is whatever. In the last year we’ve rented at least one Kia, Hyundai, Chevy, Nissan, Volkswagen, Ford and Toyota, and that’s just off the top of my head. (By far the best was a Chevy Impala. I actually loved it. So, naturally, it’s being discontinued.)

All of that, of course, applies only Continue reading "On renting cars"

#RectangleBingo


This post is by Doc Searls from Doc Searls Weblog


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This is a game for our time. I play it on New York and Boston subways, but you can play it anywhere everybody in a crowd is staring at their personal rectangle.

I call it Rectangle Bingo.

Here’s how you play. At the moment where everyone is staring down at their personal rectangle, you shoot a pano of the whole scene. Nobody will see you because they’re not present: they’re absorbed in rectangular worlds outside their present space/time.

Then you post your pano somewhere search engines will find it, and hashtag it #RectangularBingo.

Then, together, we’ll think up some way to recognize winners.

Game?

Thrills & Chills in Frequent Flyerland


This post is by Pamela from Adventures of an Eternal Optimist


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In 2018 I had a chance to compare top tier status on both United and Alaska.  Most of you are probably running away screaming at spending that much time on airplanes, Graph showing all my flights (2010-present, not just 2018) courtesy AppintheAir but I love it, it is a perk to me not a drawback. Here are my thoughts on United MileagePlus Premier 1K vs Alaska MVP Gold 75k, for all you crazy folks who are air[plane][port][line] geeks like me.  Yes, this is anecdotal, but at 190k miles last year, spent both on business and personal travel (remember, I’m a Canadian married to an Australian, living in the US), I have *lots* of anecdotes.  (note: all photos mine, I tweet a lot of them under the hashtag #ViewFromTheWindowSeat on Twitter. The map is from AppintheAir)

Best Perk: Adjacent Flight Hopping

Adjacent flight hopping is the allowance that the airline makes for a passenger to move to a confirmed

Photo by P. Dingle. all rights reserved
Photo by P. Dingle. all rights reserved
Photo by P. Dingle. all rights reserved
Photo by P. Dingle. all rights reserved
Continue reading "Thrills & Chills in Frequent Flyerland"

W3C Web Authentication (WebAuthn) advances to Proposed Recommendation (PR)


This post is by Mike Jones from Mike Jones: self-issued


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W3C logoThe World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has published a Proposed Recommendation (PR) for the Web Authentication (WebAuthn) specification, bringing WebAuthn one step closer to becoming a completed standard. The Proposed Recommendation is at https://www.w3.org/TR/2019/PR-webauthn-20190117/.

The PR contains only clarifications and editorial improvements to the second Candidate Recommendation (CR), with no substantial changes. The next step will be to publish a Recommendation – a W3C standard – based on the Proposed Recommendation.

Dress Appropriately


This post is by Craig Burton from Craig Burton


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Seoul Smog

There is a serious smog problem in Seoul Korea. Sensitive to this issue since we live here in Seoul. ( I love it here, but the pollution scares me.)

I’ve been dismissing the masks being worn as useless. I decided I need to speak from real information not assumption.

NPR published a study in 2016 to show just how serious things are.

2016 Particulate Index

Koreans worry much more about environmental issues (air pollution is #1 concern) that danger from North Korea. In fact, North Korean threats rank #5 in importance. Seoul has 10.1m people in an area that covers 12% of South Korea. One of the most densely populated and homogeneous cities in the world. There are some 22.8m cars in Seoul. Korean car emissions and manufacturing produce the most harmful emissions in Seoul.

To contrast, there are barely 3m people total in the

Continue reading "Dress Appropriately"

Idea: Woodstock vs. TED.


This post is by Doc Searls from Doc Searls Weblog


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So I just read about “a 50th anniversary Woodstock celebration that would include TED-style talks.” Details here and here in the Gothamist.

This celebration doesn’t have the Woodstock name, but it does have the place, now called the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts. Since the Woodstock name belongs to folks planning the other big Woodstock 50th birthday party, this one is called, lengthily but simply, the Bethel Woods Music and Cultural Festival.

The idea of Woodstock + TED has my head spinning, especially since I was at Woodstock (sort of) and I’m no stranger to the TED stage.

So here’s my idea: Woodstock vs. TED. Have a two-stage smackdown. Surviving Woodstock performers on one stage, and TED talkers on the other, then a playoff between the two, ending with a fight on just one stage. Imagine: burning guitars against a lecture on brain chemistry or Continue reading "Idea: Woodstock vs. TED."

Neworked Societies – First Year Seminar


This post is by Alice Marwick from BLOG – tiara.org


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Finally finished the syllabus for my brand-spanking-new class!

Description

The “network” is the 21st century’s most popular metaphor, used to describe relationships, economies, the movement of people and goods around the globe, technological infrastructures, and politics. In this class, we will delve into the relationship between networked digital technologies (social media, video games, server farms, gig economy apps like Uber, etc.); networked logistics, finances, and labor; and the ways we think about ourselves, our communities, our careers, our possessions and our futures. Specifically, this semester we will be using amazon.com, the world’s biggest retailer (and most valuable US company), to examine the impact of digital and communication technologies on labor, supply chains, publishing, retail, urban planning, web hosting, infrastructures, and gaming, to name but a few.

The goal of this seminar is to provide participants with a set of critical and theoretical tools to interpret the complexity of Continue reading "Neworked Societies – First Year Seminar"

The Laws of Identity


This post is by Phil Windley's Technometria from Phil Windley's Technometria


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Summary: In this post, I make a case that Sovrin not only conforms to Kim Cameron's Seven Laws of Identity, but constitutes the identity metasystem he envisioned in 2004.

Law Books

In 2005, Microsoft's Chief Identity Architect, Kim Cameron wrote an influential paper called The Laws of Identity (PDF). Kim had been talking about and formulating these laws in 2004 and throughout 2005. It's no coincidence that Internet Identity Workshop got started in 2005. Many people were talking about user-centric identity and developing ideas about how we might be able to create an identity layer for the Internet. Fifteen years later, we're still at it, but getting closer and closer all the time.

The Internet was created without any way to identify the people who used it. The Internet was a network of machines. Consequently, all the identity in Internet protocols is designed to identify machines and services. People used the Internet

Credential Flow for Alice Obtaining a Loan
Continue reading "The Laws of Identity"

The new together


This post is by Doc Searls from Doc Searls Weblog


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I want to point to three great posts.

First is Larry Lessig‘s Podcasting and the Slow Democracy Movement. A pull quote:

The architecture of the podcast is the precise antidote for the flaws of the present. It is deep where now is shallow. It is insulated from ads where now is completely vulnerable. It is a chance for thinking and reflection; it has an attention span an order of magnitude greater than the Tweet. It is an opportunity for serious (and playful) engagement. It is healthy eating for a brain-scape that now gorges on fast food.

If 2016 was the Twitter election — fast food, empty calorie content driving blood pressure but little thinking — then 2020 must be the podcast election — nutrient-rich, from every political perspective. Not sound bites driven by algorithms, but reflective and engaged humans doing what humans still do best: thinking with empathy about ideals that could make us better — as Continue reading "The new together"